NYC 2016 Week 14 (10/09 – 10/15) / Maratón de Baltimore

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La elevación al principio estuvo perrísima.

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Orioles Park at Camden Yard

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M&T Stadium, casa de los Browns alados

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En el zoológico, en la exhibición de los pingüinos

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Medallita de cangrejo

Add comment October 16, 2016

Maratón de Baltimore

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El fin de semana pasado estaba en Chicago cuando se corrió el maratón y no pude ni acercarme a la ciudad a verlo…

Este fin viajo a Baltimore y resulta que el maratón es éste sábado y sale y termina enfrente de mi hotel!

Me toca corrida larga de 3:30, así que me inscribí para correr ese tiempo y caminar el resto. Se ve bastante bueno, corres adentro del zoológico!

Add comment October 13, 2016

NYC 2016 Week 13 (10/02 – 10/08)

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En Chicago, y mañana se corre el maratón….

Add comment October 8, 2016

Aquiles.

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Peritendinitis del tendón…

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Add comment October 7, 2016

Septiembre

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Avg min/mile 10:10

Add comment October 1, 2016

NYC 2016 Week 13 (9/25 – 10/01)

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Add comment October 1, 2016

NYC 2016 Week 12 (9/18 – 9/24)

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Add comment September 25, 2016

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Registrados en la aplicación de miCoach.

Add comment September 23, 2016

Activity Trackers May Undermine Weight Loss Efforts

Effect of Wearable Technology Combined With a Lifestyle Intervention on Long-term Weight Loss
The IDEA Randomized Clinical Trial

John M. Jakicic, PhD; Kelliann K. Davis, PhD; Renee J. Rogers, PhD; Wendy C. King, PhD; Marsha D. Marcus, PhD; Diane Helsel, PhD, RD; Amy D. Rickman, PhD, RD, LDN; Abdus S. Wahed, PhD; Steven H. Belle, PhD

Importance  Effective long-term treatments are needed to address the obesity epidemic. Numerous wearable technologies specific to physical activity and diet are available, but it is unclear if these are effective at improving weight loss.

Objective  To test the hypothesis that, compared with a standard behavioral weight loss intervention (standard intervention), a technology-enhanced weight loss intervention (enhanced intervention) would result in greater weight loss.

Design, Setting, Participants  Randomized clinical trial conducted at the University of Pittsburgh and enrolling 471 adult participants between October 2010 and October 2012, with data collection completed by December 2014.

Interventions  Participants were placed on a low-calorie diet, prescribed increases in physical activity, and had group counseling sessions. At 6 months, the interventions added telephone counseling sessions, text message prompts, and access to study materials on a website. At 6 months, participants randomized to the standard intervention group initiated self-monitoring of diet and physical activity using a website, and those randomized to the enhanced intervention group were provided with a wearable device and accompanying web interface to monitor diet and physical activity.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The primary outcome of weight was measured over 24 months at 6-month intervals, and the primary hypothesis tested the change in weight between 2 groups at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included body composition, fitness, physical activity, and dietary intake.

Results  Among the 471 participants randomized (body mass index [BMI], 25 to <40; age range, 18-35 years; 28.9% nonwhite, 77.2% women), 470 (233 in the standard intervention group, 237 in the enhanced intervention group) initiated the interventions as randomized, and 74.5% completed the study. For the enhanced intervention group, mean baseline weight was 96.3 kg (95% CI, 94.2-98.5) and 24-month weight 89.3 kg (95% CI, 87.1-91.5). For the standard intervention group, mean baseline weight was 95.2 kg (95% CI, 93.0-97.3) and 24-month weight was 92.8 kg (95% CI, 90.6-95.0). Weight change at 24 months differed significantly by intervention group (estimated mean weight loss, 3.5 kg [95% CI, 2.6-4.5} in the enhanced intervention group and 5.9 kg [95% CI, 5.0-6.8] in the standard intervention group; difference, 2.4 kg [95% CI, 1.0-3.7]; P = .002). Both groups had significant improvements in body composition, fitness, physical activity, and diet, with no significant difference between groups.

Conclusions and Relevance  Among young adults with a BMI between 25 and less than 40, the addition of a wearable technology device to a standard behavioral intervention resulted in less weight loss over 24 months. Devices that monitor and provide feedback on physical activity may not offer an advantage over standard behavioral weight loss approaches.

Trial Registration  clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01131871

Add comment September 20, 2016

NYC 2016 Week 11 (9/11 – 9/17)

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Add comment September 18, 2016

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